Archive for July, 2012

Bhakti in Essence – Narada Bhakti Sutra – Sutra 2

July 27th, 2012

Narada Bhakti Sutra

Sutra 2

sā tv-asmin parama-prema-rūpā

The nature of bhakti is the topmost love for God.

 

The first verse of Narada Bhakti Sutra announced the subject of the book, implied bhakti’s superlative position, and hinted at the urgency to realize the self through the study and practice of bhakti. This second verse now defines the nature of such bhakti — it is the purest love for God.

Sri Rupa Goswami, a prominent 15th century successor of Sri Narada, thus defined bhakti as follows.

“True bhakti is activity not covered by any selfish desire and done with the exclusive intention to please God.”

Thus bhakti in its topmost form has two pertinent characteristics: it is free of all selfish motives, and it is focused upon God. It is easy to see that true devotion cannot be selfish, but why does it have to be for God?

 

Continue Reading »

 

The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility – Part II

July 25th, 2012

The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility – Part II

On July 24, 2012, Srila Dhanurdhara Swami gave the second part in a series entitled The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility” at The Bhakti Center in New York. The following is a recording of that talk.

 

The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility – Part II

The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility – Part I

July 21st, 2012

The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility – Part I

On July 10, 2012, Srila Dhanurdhara Swami gave the first part in a series entitled The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility” at The Bhakti Center in New York. The following is a recording of that talk.

 

The Heart of a Yogi: The Power and Culture of Humility – Part I

Bhakti in Essence – A Commentary on Narada Bhakti Sutra

July 6th, 2012

Dhanurdhara Swami is writing a new book called Bhakti in Essence – A commentary on Narada Bhakti Sutra.

Every week he will be publishing a sutra and commentary. Maharaja’s commentary begins here:

 

Narada Bhakti Sutra
Sutra 1

athāto bhaktiḿ vyākhyāsyāmaḥ

Now, therefore, I will try to explain the process of bhakti.

 

A sutra is a condensed phrase codifying a larger body of thinking. Most Indian schools of thought systematize their teachings into a series of sutras to help their students memorize and understand the teachings. Since volumes of meaning have been condensed into very terse aphorisms, sutras are also accompanied by suitable commentaries to unpack the sutras meaning. In this way, a student can retain and understand a concise version of an entire philosophical system.

Such sutras traditionally begin with “atha” (now) to indicate the significance of the school that will be discussed and the urgency to undertake its study. By the word “now” the Narada Bhakti Sutra points to the importance and urgency of practicing bhakti-yoga.

Continue Reading »